Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque

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Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque
مسجد الخانقاه الصلاحية
Al-Khanka Mosque in the old Jerusalem.jpg
Ottoman period
Religion
AffiliationIslam
DistrictJerusalem
Location
LocationChristian Quarter, Old City, Jerusalem
Architecture
TypeMosque
StyleAyyubid, Ottoman
Minaret(s)1

The Al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque (Arabic: مسجد الخانقاه الصلاحية al-Khānqāh aṣ-Ṣalāḥiyya) is an Islamic place of worship located in the Christian Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, north of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.[1][2][3] It was named after Saladin, who endowed it. As the name indicates, the complex was originally a khanqah, a place for gatherings of Sufi Islamic adherents, including dervishes. The complex today comprises the mosque as well as a school, a public sitting room, rooms for military officers, a dining room for wayfarers, small rooms for guards, and a very small room for Saladin’s spiritual retreat.[4]

History[edit]

The building is situated on the former palace of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem.

Following the Crusader surrender of Jerusalem to Ṣalāḥ ad-Dīn (Saladin) in 1187, it became al-Khānqāh aṣ-Ṣalāḥiyya (lit.'the lodge of Saladin'). The building comprised a mosque, a school, a public sitting room, rooms for military officers, a dining room for wayfarers, and small rooms originally for guards, as well as a very small room for Salah ad-Din (Saladin)'s spiritual retreat. As the name indicates, it has also been a Khanqah, a convent of Sufi adherents.[4]

The minaret was built in 1417, during the Mamluk period.[5][6] The minaret is almost identical to that of the Mosque of Omar, located on the other side of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.[2] The two minarets were obviously designed as a pair; a line connecting the two minarets would intersect the door of the Tomb of Jesus inside the church, and the minarets are equidistant to that door[7] with their tops at exactly the same elevation despite starting at different ground levels.[8]

The 1936 Survey of Palestine map – the Khanqa mosque is number 35

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "al-Khanqah al-Salahiyya Mosque - Madain Project (en)". madainproject.com. Retrieved 2022-06-18.
  2. ^ a b "El-Khanqah as-Salahiyya Moschee in Jerusalem, Bilderserie, Fotos, Photos für DSL". www.theologische-links.de. Retrieved 2022-06-18.
  3. ^ PASSIA ISLAMIC AND CHRISTIAN HOLY PLACES
  4. ^ a b Murphy-O'Connor, Jerome (2008-02-28). The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide from Earliest Times to 1700. OUP Oxford. ISBN 978-0-19-152867-5.
  5. ^ Winter, Dave & Matthews, John (1999). Israel Handbook, p. 147. Footprint Travel Guides. ISBN 1-900949-48-2
  6. ^ Moudjir ed-Dyn (1876), p. 169
  7. ^ El Khanqah-Moschee in Jerusalem (German text and pictures at theologische-links.de)
  8. ^ Murphy-O’Connor, J. (2008). The Holy Land: An Oxford Archaeological Guide from Earliest Times to 1700. Oxford Archaeological Guides. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 62. ISBN 978-0-19-923666-4. Retrieved 20 June 2016.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°46′43.68″N 35°13′45.53″E / 31.7788000°N 35.2293139°E / 31.7788000; 35.2293139