Emblem of Jerusalem

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Emblem of Jerusalem
Emblem of Jerusalem.svg
Adopted1949
Crestירושלים‎ (lit.'Jerusalem')
BlazonBlue shield with the Lion of Judah in the centre, flanked on either side by olive branches and all superimposed on a stylized background representing the Western Wall.

The emblem of Jerusalem is a standalone official symbol that is also used on the flag of Jerusalem. It consists of a shield with the Lion of Judah flanked on either side by olive branches, all superimposed on a stylized background representing the Western Wall. Above the main display is the Hebrew-language word for Jerusalem (ירושלים‎, Yerushaláyim).

History[edit]

Shortly after the founding of Israel, then-mayor Gershon Agron of West Jerusalem initiated a design contest among local graphic designers for a new municipal emblem. The winning design was presented by a team led by master typographer and graphic artist Eliyahu Koren.[1][2][3][clarification needed]

In 1943, the Jerusalem Municipality had approved a different emblem for the city, but the decision was never ratified by the British Mandate.[clarification needed][citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Avrin, Leila. "People of the Book: Eliyahu Koren," Israel Bibliophiles, Spring 1986. p2 }}
  2. ^ Friedman, Joshua J. "Prayer Type: How Eliyahu Koren used typography to encourage a new way to pray." quote = "Koren oversaw the creation of many of Israel’s most prominent symbols, including its first postage stamp and, in his own design, the seal of the city of Jerusalem—a lion rampant in front of the Wailing Wall, framed by olive branches—still in use today.", Tablet, June 30, 2009.
  3. ^ Jeremy Stolow, Orthodox by Design: Judaism, Print Politics, and the ArtScroll Revolution University of California Press, 2010. p.215 quote= noted for the creation of numerous prominent Israeli symbols, including the seal of the city of Jerusalem and Israel’s first postage stamp.