Kiryat Moshe

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Kiryat Moshe

Kiryat Moshe (Hebrew: קריית משה) is a neighborhood in Jerusalem, named for the British Jewish philanthropist Moses Montefiore. Kiryat Moshe is bordered by Givat Shaul.

History[edit]

Kiryat Moshe was founded in 1923 with funding from the Moses Montefiore Testimonial Fund in London.[1] It was one of the garden suburbs established in Jerusalem in the 1920s, along with Beit Hakerem, Talpiot, Rehavia and Bayit VaGan. Designed by the German Jewish architect Richard Kauffmann, these neighborhoods were based on clusters of single family homes surrounded by gardens and greenery. One of the main features was a central landscaped island, as can be seen on Hameiri Boulevard in Kiryat Moshe.[2]

From the outset, Kiryat Moshe projected "Hebrew" pioneering, home to merchants and later teachers and bus drivers, both prestigious groups in the new Jewish society. Kiryat Moshe was designated as a national-religious neighborhood, and many rabbis and leaders of the Mizrachi movement settled there.[3]

Schools and landmark buildings[edit]

On the road to Kiryat Moshe

Educational institutions in Kiryat Moshe include Merkaz Harav yeshiva and Machon Meir.

Notable residents[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kark, Ruth; Oren-Nordheim, Michal (January 31, 2001). Jerusalem and Its Environs: Quarters, Neighborhoods, Villages, 1800-1948. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0814329098 – via Google Books.
  2. ^ "Jerusalem during the British Mandate".
  3. ^ a b c The Makings of History, Haaretz
  4. ^ Karpal, Dalia (13 March 2009). "דמותו של פרופ' יהודה ליבס: חוקר קבלה שנוי במחלוקת ודתי ציוני" [Professor Yehuda Liebes: A Controversial Kabbalah Scholar and Religious Zionist]. Haaretz (in Hebrew). Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  5. ^ The Genizah at the House of Yellin, Jewish Quarterly
  6. ^ Shalev, Ben (3 July 2019). "מה הסוד של ישי ריבו, כוכב-העל שמצליח בקרב חרדים, סרוגים וחילונים?" [What is Ishay Ribo's Secret? Superstar Popular with the Orthodox, Kippah-wearing and Secular Crowds] (in Hebrew). Haaretz. Retrieved 15 May 2020.

Coordinates: 31°47′12″N 35°11′44″E / 31.786734°N 35.195475°E / 31.786734; 35.195475